Pia Andersen

Reflections on the new works of Pia Andersen

1990, individual exhibition, Pia Andersen, Nikolaj Kunstbygning, Copenhagen and Leopold Hoesch Museum, Düren, Germany. - Text by: Torben Weirup, artcritic at the major morningpaper Berlingske Tidende



The latest works of Pia Andersen indicate a rapid artistic maturing and fruitful meeting with another artistic tradition and its colour tone.

An amazing short time has passed through The Large Hourglass, since Pia Andersen worked with closely small grey pictures, partly exploring the possibilities of a well-defined, but still rich scale of colour, partly experimenting with beginning disintegration of geometric structures. The paper was the over-all dominating material in these confrontations between the structured and the organic, between system and destruction.

The disintegration has gone quite a bit father in Pia Andersen´s new, much freer pictures. Paper – handmade and dyed as well as casual pieces – is still an important material, which the artist is using to impart the pictures substance and structure.

Structures or designs, seemingly parts of a larger whole laying far beyond the frame of the picture´s casual cut, is still constituting the pictures, maintaining a certain language of form – maybe Pia Andersen in reality is turning to a kind of material and imprecise constructive painting? – But the conclusive new in the works is the wealth of colours Pia Andersen so generously is sprinkling over the pictures, like the colour on the breast of a pheasant, like the landscapes on an old-fashioned map of the world.

Ultramarin-blue is the preferred colour, but if one enters into the landscapes of the picture of Pia Andersen and look at them, so to speak from the air, the roads through jungle- and crate-landscapes, the visitor is met by a true colour-orgy, areas of richly facetted local colouristic lapses.

Naturally it is the experiences and impressions from The trip to Mexico in 1988/89, which are settling in the new works of Pia Andersen – but they do not represent Latin-American art. These are the fruits of a meeting, prepared in a mind and coined in a personal and independent expression.